Episode 13 with Miriam Klein Stahl

This week we talk to Bay Area artist Miriam Klein Stahl about punk rock, teaching, resistance art, and much, much more.


Miriam Klein Stahl  is an artist, educator and activist and the New York Times-bestselling illustrator of Rad American Women A-Z and Rad Women Worldwide . In addition to her work in printmaking, drawing, sculpture, paper-cut and public art, she is also the co-founder of the Arts and Humanities Academy at Berkeley High School where she’s taught since 1995. As an artist, she follows in a tradition of making socially relevant work, creating portraits of political activists, misfits, radicals and radical movements. As an educator, she has dedicated her teaching practice to address equity through the lens of the arts. Her work has been widely exhibited and reproduced internationally. Stahl is also the co-owner of Pave the Way Skateboards, a queer skateboarding company formed with Los Angeles-based comedian, actor, writer and skateboarder Tara Jepson. She lives in Berkeley, California with her wife, artist Lena Wolff, daughter Hazel, and their dog Lenny.

Episode 11 with Daryle Lamont Jenkins

On this episode Kevin and Joshua sit down with Daryle Lamont Jenkins and talk about his early days as a punk, his work with One People’s Project, fighting Nazis, Antifa, and much, much more.

Daryle is an American political activist, best known for founding One People’s Project, an organization based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that is closely aligned with the antifascist movement. Jenkins serves as its Executive Director.

Episode 10 with Gabe Meline

This week we sit down with Gabe Meline to talk about writing zines, booking Green Day in High School, the Sonoma county fires, and more!


Gabe Meline is KQED Arts’ Senior Editor. He entered the world of journalism at age 15 as the editor of a photocopied zine, and has since earned awards from the Society for Professional Journalists, the Online Journalism Awards, the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the California Newspaper Publishers Association. Prior to KQED, he was the editor of the North Bay Bohemian and a touring musician. He lives with his wife, his daughter, and a 1964 Volvo in his hometown of Santa Rosa, CA. Find him on Twitter at @gmeline.

Episode 9 with A.C. Thompson

This week we sit down with ProPublica staff reporter A.C. Thompson.

His stories, which often examine the criminal justice system, have helped lead to the exoneration of two innocent San Francisco men sentenced to life in prison and the prosecution of seven New Orleans police officers. In addition to working as a print and web journalist, Thompson has reported extensively for television, serving as a producer and correspondent for the PBS documentary series Frontline. His life was fictionalized on the HBO show “Treme.”

Episode 9 with Larry Livermore

This week we sit down with Larry Livermore and talk about his childhood in Detroit, wandering America, Lookout! Records, what he’s up to now and so much more!

Larry Livermore is an American singer, musician, record producer, and author, best known as the co-founder of Lookout! Records.

Season 2 coming soon

Season 2 is starting with a bang as we Welcome Larry Livermore to the show. Something tells us, this is going to be good. Not only do we get to interview one of our favorite people we get to do so from the comfort of our new studio.

Look for it soon.

We’re also excited to announce our second guest of Season 2, A.C. Thompson writer for Pro Republica and producer for @frontlinepbs. More guest announcements soon.

This is going to be a good season.

Episode 6 with Cynthia Connolly

This week we talk to Cynthia Connolly about her early punk days in LA and Washington DC, publishing books, photography, working with Maximum Rock ‘n Roll, meeting the Mackaye family, growing up with a single mom, and continuing to create rad things.

Cynthia Connolly is an American photographer, curator, graphic designer, and artist. She graduated from Corcoran College of Art and Designand worked for Dischord Records and d.c. space. In 1988 she published Banned in DC: Photos and Anecdotes From the DC Punk Underground (79–85) through her small press Sun Dog Propaganda.

One of Cynthia Connolly’s most well known works, ironically, is one of her first works of commercial art. It is the image drawn for the band Minor Threat, in 1983, when she was 19 years old, for the 12″ LP entitled, “Out of Step” on Dischord Records. This drawing, showing a black sheep with his eyes wide open, drawn in crayon, leaping away from a group of white sheep rendered in watercolor is used, particularly the black sheep, as tattoo art for many around the world and represents an entire movement and idea from a generation of people who find the band Minor Threat and that entire hardcore (music) movement influential in their lives. Many of the artists in the “Beautiful Losers’ exhibit were influenced by the work and music, and the record album was exhibited in this show.

Cynthia Connolly continues to exhibit her photography, create ephemeral objects using her letterpress and photographs, and is Special Projects Curator for Arlington County, Virginia.